Tutorial
This example helps us find the various athletes and teams sponsored by Nike. The example input we provide to achieve this query intent has two entities: Tiger Woods and Nike Inc. This is an example instance of an athlete (Tiger Woods) sponsored by Nike.
This example helps us find the various space disasters that have happened and the victims of the same. The example input here too contains a single tuple, with two entities: Kalpana Chawla and Columbia space disaster.
This is an extension of athletes sponsored by Nike. This example provides two example tuples as input. The second input tuple can be added by clicking on the '+' button. One requirement of the system is that it expects the entity types across the various tuples to be aligned. For instance, since Tiger Woods is the first entity and Nike the second entity in tuple 1, tuple 2 requires Kobe Bryant to be the first entity and Nike the second.
This example helps find various soccer players in A.C. Milan footbal club. This is another example for using multiple input tuples. The second input tuple can be added by clicking on the '+' button. One requirement of the system is that it expects the entity types across the various tuples to be aligned. For instance, since David Beckham is the first entity and A.C. Milan the second entity in tuple 1, tuple 2 requires Kaka to be the first entity and A.C. Milan the second.
This example helps us find various university professors who have won the Turing Award. The example tuple chosen to represent this query intent consists of Donald Knuth, who is a professor at Stanford University and has won the Turing Award. The input tuple is an example instance of a university professor who has won the Turing Award.
This example helps us find various Turing Award winning scientists who have also designed a programming language. An example of such a query intent is the tuple containing Donald Knuth, who has won the Turing Award and designed TeX.